Stream 1: Environment

Similarities, stressors and sustainability of southern hemisphere estuaries on wave-dominated coasts
  • Kerrylee Rogers1, Débora de Freitas2, Andrew Green3, Marinez Scherer4, Janine Adams5 and Colin Woodroffe6
  • 1School of Earth and Environmental Science, University of Wollongong, Australia
  • 2Instituto de Biociências, Universidade Estadual Paulista (UNESP), Brazil
  • 3Geological Sciences, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa
  • 4Laboratório de Gestão Costeira Integrada, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Brazil
  • 5Department of Botany, Nelson Mendela University, South Africa
  • 6School of Earth and Environmental Science, University of Wollongong, Australia

Coasts and estuaries of the southern hemisphere share key characteristics. In contrast to better studied systems of the northern hemisphere, these coastlines are subjected to high energy wave conditions, and have experienced relatively stable sea level, at or above present, for several millennia, resulting in comparable coastal and estuarine geomorphology. Spanning a large latitudinal range from tropical to temperate and exposed to minimal circumpolar circulation, coasts and estuaries of this hemisphere also exhibit remarkably similar climates that in combination with comparable geomorphology influences the composition and distribution of estuarine vegetation and fauna. Drawing upon research undertaken in this region and with the intention of sharing scientific knowledge, the session will provide a forum for discussing similarities in coastal and estuarine geomorphology, ecology, function, services and human well-bring. This session, sponsored by the Commission on Coastal Systems (International Geographical Union) will discuss the sustainability of estuaries and coasts in the face of both climatic and anthropogenic stressors at a range of spatial scales. It is anticipated that the session will include oral and poster presentations, and a facilitated discussion with the objective to coordinate research efforts and identify new collaborations across the southern hemisphere.

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  • Elsevier
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