Special Sessions

Anthropogenic pressure


No:

0006

Title

Contaminated estuaries and coastal seas

Organizers

Leon J. Clarke
Manchester Metropolitan University, UK

Abstract

This session solicits presentations of studies that investigate contemporary and/or historical contamination of estuaries and coastal seas. Potential contaminants include, but are not limited to, organic pollutants (e.g. antibotics, pesticides and pharmaceuticals), metals, nutrients and microplastics. Studies can be focused on marine biota and/or sediments and could also include consideration of the ecotoxicological impact of contaminant release into the marine environment.

 

No:

0021

Title

Human forcing and constraints in the coast-estuarine system

Organizers

Cheng Heqin and Chen Zongyuan
State Ke Laboratory of estuarine and Coastal Research, East China Nornal University, China

Abstract

The coastal system has an environmental complexity on the Earth surface, consisting of land, ocean and atmosphere. Active teraction has been occurring between these three key unites added by the intensifying human intervention in the past decades. The rapidly growing population over the last century has driven up the unprecedented momentum and vitality for our societal development, while at the same time, it has brought and will bring new resources and environment pressure to the Earth surface. This means that the role of our human forcings on the Earth surface have become increasingly significant. How to harmonize between the modes and intensity of human activities, in the context of ecological civilization becomes a hot spot of discussion in our relevant coast-estuarine communities. Nevertheless, the Earth is an open and complex giant system, in which multiple dynamics interact. To-date, there are so many issues that have not been solved yet, including coast-estuarine environmental degradation, water pollution, ocean-land hazard, impact from increasing population, accelerating climate warming and sea level rise, and policy adjustment and management as well. These has certainly kept the high-focus for our scientists from all fields of the world, who have been working together towards any possible solution of this great task. The purpose of organizing this session is to provide a unique forum for all scientists, decision makers, governmental officers and relevant stakeholders to present their novel idea and updated research results that is going to be shared each other during the session time.

 

No:

0027

Title

Double whammy: impact of pollution and climate change on urbanised estuaries

Organizers

Xiaoguang Ouyang
Chinese University of Hong Kong, China

Abstract

Estuaries have been confronting unprecedented impact from urbanisation and industrialisation for decades. Many metropolises and emerging mega-cities are located in estuaries. Meanwhile, low-lying areas around estuaries are most vulnerable to storm surges and sea level rise. Emerging pollution problems from urbanisation and industrialisation (e.g. electronic waste and pharmaceutic wastewater) have profound impact on estuarine ecosystems. Coastal wetlands can protect coastal communities from storm surges during extreme weather events but they have suffered continued losses due to anthropogenic activities as well as extreme weather (e.g. prolonged drought). Emerging projections show coastal communities have been too complacent about their vulnerability to rising sea levels. This session will address the combined impact of pollution and climate change on estuaries.

 

No:

0048

Title

Structure and function of artificially created semi-enclosed coastal ecosystems

Organizers

Tamara Cibic and Lucia Bongiorni
OGS Trieste, Italy

Abstract

Nowadays, the extension of coastal areas highly modified by humans is so wide that we should properly refer to these as coastal urban ecosystems. Coastal infrastructures such as harbors, ports, breakwaters and marinas create commonly occurring examples of semi-enclosed, highly anthropized basins that have lost much of the original habitats. In addition, large maritime engineering works have been designed to strongly confine portions of the coastal area from the open sea, as is the case of the MOSE mobile gates, which will be able to isolate the Venice lagoon temporarily from the Adriatic Sea during extreme high tides. Artificially semi-enclosed ecosystems can experience prolonged periods of limited hydrodynamics, oxygen deficiency, accumulation of organic matter and contaminants, which in turn might shape the structure and function of inhabiting communities favoring opportunistic species and NIS. This special session will focus on the array of potential impacts induced by artificial (semi-) enclosed embayments on biodiversity and ecosystem functioning. Although much of the original habitats have been lost, these ecosystems still work while providing Ecosystem Services, therefore, their functioning deserves to be investigated and inserted in monitoring and management plans. We welcome specifically contributions that aim to present results from field experiments that highlight the consequences of these basins on the structure and function of planktonic and benthic local communities and their management. The session will contribute to the ongoing debate on the integration of infrastructure development with the conservation of biodiversity and the maintenance of ecosystem services in these highly anthropized ecosystems.

 

No:

0052

Title

The Wadden Sea ecosystem: Human impacts, management concepts and challenges for the future

Organizers

Inga Nordhaus and Sascha Klöpper
Lower Saxon Wadden Sea National Park Authority, Wilhelmshaven, Gernamy

Abstract

The Wadden Sea is stretching along the North coast of Denmark, Germany and the Netherlands and is characterized by tidal flats and a barrier island system with extensive salt marshes. It is a National Park in all three countries as well as an UNESCO World Heritage site. Although human activities in this area are clearly regulated and restricted, interventions such as dredging and dumping of sediments in the estuaries, tourism, fisheries, the entry of nutrients and pollutants, as well as global climate change can affect water and sediment quality, the hydrology and morphology of the ecosystem and its structure, functions and services.
The objective of this special session is to present current research on the processes, structure, biodiversity and functions of the Wadden Sea ecosystem, the response to anthropogenic activities and climate change as well as concepts for the improvement of protective and management measures. We encourage the discussion of science-based solutions to counteract the impacts of climate change and of experiences on the effectiveness of management measures taken so far. The session will bring together scientists from all disciplines and professionals from the authorities to exchange research results and management concepts and will encourage the networking among the countries.

 

No:

0055

Title

Sediment management in estuaries – from minimizing ecological impacts to possible win-win situations

Organizers

Mailin Eberle and Anna Zorndt
Federal Institute of Hydrology (BfG), Germany

Abstract

In order to maintain waterways and harbors in estuaries, huge amounts of sediments are dredged and placed at special placement sites every day. This has various ecological impacts in estuaries, such as direct damage of benthic organisms, possible disturbances of birds or seals and temporary increase of suspended matter. However, determining the ecological impacts of sediment management is a demanding task, as estuaries are highly dynamic and complex systems and exposed to many different (anthropogenic) influences.
In recent times, responsible stakeholders for sediment management are seeking for further options to minimize negative impacts of dredging and dumping or to even develop win-win strategies, combining sediment management with ecological aims (e.g. use of dredged sediment to create islands as habitats for birds, “building with nature” strategies).
The session invites approaches and examples which further investigate impacts of sediment management, which compare different sediment management strategies or which present novel approaches / ideas to minimize the ecological impacts of sediment management or achieve win-win situations.

Biodiversity and biological conservation


No:

0046

Title

Monitoring organisms in estuarine and coastal areas by new technologies

Organizers

Akihide Kasai and Yoh Yamashita
Hokkaido University,Japan

Abstract

Monitoring organisms in aquatic systems has been a big concern because of the absence in relative evaluation using conventional methods. Lack of sufficient information on the number of species, biomass, and migration that linked to biodiversity has often prevented the understanding of ecosystems in estuaries and coastal areas. However, recent technologies such as environmental DNA and bio-telemetry (bio-logging) enable us to engage in extensive research for monitoring. Analysis of sufficient biological data with precise environmental parameters will lead to new insights about estuarine and coastal ecology. In this session, the introduction of new technologies, analysis results of coastal and estuarine ecosystems and biodiversity by new technologies and methods are welcome.

Climate adaptation and mitigation


No:

0039

Title

Secrets exposed by coastal change: Promoting the role of marine and coastal heritage in climate change adaptation strategies

Organizers

Sandra Fatorić and Luciana S. Esteves
Delft University of Technology,

Abstract

Past and present populations have gathered along coasts and estuaries shaping the world’s marine and coastal (cultural and natural) heritage (MCH), a finite and irreplaceable resource. Rapid coastal change threatens the preservation of (known and hidden) heritage of (local to global) cultural and economic value. Research and policy developments on climate change adaptation and risk reduction are ubiquitous, but few address the sustainability of MCH, particularly in less developed countries. This session seeks to identify ways to better promote MCH into coastal management and planning and climate adaptation policies. Rather than a passive resource to be protected, how can the data and perspectives gained from considering MCH help define these strategies? We would like to invite presentations that address the opportunities or impacts created by new exposures or the loss of MCH and the related socioeconomic-cultural-environmental implications, including for the most vulnerable people. Topics may include but are not limited to emerging frameworks, tools, methods for assessing and reducing risks/vulnerabilities to diverse MCH (e.g. landscapes, buildings, archaeological sites, traditional practices, oral histories). An open discussion at the end of the session will seek to build connections between researchers, coastal managers, planners and others interested in the sustainability of MCH worldwide.

Coastal Conservation


No:

0031

Title

Lessons learnt from conservation/restoration actions of coastal dune habitats

Organizers

Susana Costas and Ana Isabel Fagundes
University of Algarve, Center for Marine and Environmental Research, Portugal

Abstract

Well-documented services provided by coastal dunes include coastal protection and biodiversity, as they constitute the first line of defense against the impact of storms and are catalogued as priority habitats. Their disruption, by natural or anthropic causes, leads to an increased risk to coastal populations and to a perturbation of their ecology and provided ecosystem services. Therefore, dune restoration, including the conservation of habitats and species, has been recurrently applied over the last decades as a tool to minimize coastal risks and ensure the conservation of biodiversity. This special session aims to create a forum where experiences from dune conservation and restoration projects worldwide, including past and current EU funded LIFE projects, can be shared and discussed within the coastal scientific community. This forum will allow the exchange of lessons learnt from previous experiences in order to identify novel or more adequate management approaches to ensure the natural morphological response, and the conservation of functions and services of coastal dunes facing current and future threats. The special session will include a number of oral presentations followed by a dynamised discussion where the participants can further discuss and share their experiences on coastal dune conservation and/or restoration.

Coastal development and engineering


No:

0050

Title

Future proofing sea defences to enhance biodiversity

Organizers

Alice Hall  and Sue Hull
Bournemouth University, UK

Abstract

Ocean sprawl, the addition of manmade artificial structures within the marine environment is having a significant effect on the marine environment. Ecological enhancement creates multifunctional structures which perform their primary engineering function but also provide suitable habitat for marine life. This session aims to bring together researchers and practitioners to present and discuss existing ecological enhancement schemes and develop improved methods for future schemes via sharing of good practice. This session would be highly relevant to coastal engineers and the coastal scientific community. The session will include a keynote presentation from several experts on existing schemes followed by a workshop evaluating current enhancement schemes and promoting best practice.

 

No:

0051

Title

Studying the impact of human interventions on estuarine hydrodynamics and sediment transport in environmental impact assessments

Organizers

Anna Zorndt and Frank Kösters
Federal Waterways Engineering and Research Institute,

Abstract

Estuaries are unique ecological systems, but also often serve as fairways to seaports and
harbors in the hinterland. Therefore, they are often subject of human interventions, such as river deepening or constructions of ports or coastal structures. Carefully assessing the environmental impacts of such interventions has become increasingly important due to the estuaries’ high ecological importance. The first step in an ecological impact assessment (EIA) is often an assessment of the abiotic parameters, i. e. changes in current velocities, water levels, salinity, turbidity or sediment transport patterns. Changes in those parameters may have great impacts on the habitats and populations of the estuary, so there is a need for detailed investigation and quantification. This assessment is usually carried out with numerical models, comparing the results of current state and scenario simulations of hydrodynamics and sediment transport.
In this session, studies are welcome which deal with assessing impacts of human inter-ventions on hydrodynamics and / or sediment transport in estuaries, presenting case studies or focusing for example on the modeling tools, relevant processes (baroclinic circulation and / or estuarine turbidity maxima, morphodynamics, …), on how to derive projections or how to deal with various model and data uncertainties.

Coastal marine habitats


No:

0053

Title

Coastal wetland adaptation to global sea level rise

Organizers

Mark Schuerch and Elizabeth Christie
University of Lincoln, UK

Abstract

Intertidal coastal wetlands, such as tidal marshes and mangrove forests, are thought to be at risk of disappearing under the influence of global sea level rise (SLR). At high and extreme SLR rates, coastal wetlands are unlikely to be able to accrete vertically at a rate sufficient to prevent reversion to unvegetated mudflat or open water. Nature-based adaptation, consisting of the creation of space for inland wetland expansion, is widely regarded as a promising strategy to conserve and restore these natural habitats. Studies on the potential for, and the process of, coastal wetland inland migration are scarce, particularly on the conditions (physical, ecological, social) that encourage or discourage migration and determine the quality of (re)created wetlands. This session welcomes contributions on global to local assessments of natural and anthropogenically facilitated adaptation mechanisms of coastal wetlands to SLR, including, but not limited to, their landward migration potential and dynamics, the provisioning of ecosystem services and governance and policy implications.

Ecological Modelling


No:

0024

Title

Ecological Network Analysis: Theory and Application

Organizers

Ursula M Scharler and Ulrike Schückel2, Victor de Jonge1  
1 University of Hull, and International Estuarine & Coastal Specialists Ltd
2University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

Abstract

The course outline includes:
- An introduction to networks and network metrics.
- How to construct networks from ecological data (practical component).
- Networks analysis (practical component)
- Applications of network analysis.
THE AIM IS A FULL DAY WORKSHOP

Ecosystem creation and restoration


No:

0035

Title

EMECS Special Session "ICM and Satoumi"

Organizers

Chisato Hosomi and Tetsuo Yanagi
International EMECS Center, Japan

Abstract

A special session on ICM and Satoumi will be held to disseminate the concept of Satoumi internationally. The session will be led by various experts from around the world, and will confirm how Satoumi is an effective method of Integrated Coastal Management (ICM) for the conservation of sea environment.
Satoumi is a traditional Japanese ecosystem that used to be found in small bays throughout Japan in days gone by, but regulations and taboos in their communities were rarely formalized and were liable to lose much of their effectiveness as a result of rapid environmental changes stemming from drastic economic development.
Water quality, once polluted by domestic and industrial waste, has improved to some extent due to painstaking efforts to reduce water pollution by restorative regulations, but damaged ecosystems and living resources have not yet fully recovered.
The successful introduction of Satoumi through human interaction is expected to improve the impoverished ecosystem and to provide greater biological diversity as habitats, greater biological production and fishing grounds.
The concept of Satoumi is gradually being recognized not only in its homeland of Japan but also at international meetings held in both western and Asian countries.

 

No:

0049

Title

Integrated estuarine restoration planning: from local case studies to global sustainable management.

Organizers

Tiago Verdelhos and Zara Teixeira
University of Coimbra / MARE - Marine and Environmental Sciences Centre, Portugal

Abstract

The operationalization of integrated estuarine management plans is a major challenge in Europe's policy framework, hindered by a poor linkage between the available knowledge and the pratical implementation of research project results. An effective connection between case studies and decision-making processes is thus essential, relying on a significant knowledge base regarding the socio-ecological interrelationships between ecosystems, the benefits society retrieves from the natural capital and human activities, and the pressures in the considered area.
This special session, developed within the scope of the project ReSEt – Restoration of Estuarine Saltmarshes towards Sustainability, addresses the importance of enabling efficient pathways for colaboration between researchers and public and private entities. An integrated management approach will potentiate the success of restoration plans, while maintaining the natural attributes of landscapes and increasing the systems resilience, and ensuring that development and the use of natural resources within the estuarine area is socially and economically justifiable and ecologically sustainable.
The 120 minutes session will accept oral presentations addressing case studies on integrated restoration, to foster discussion on how project results should be made usable by decision-makers.

Ecosystem health


No:

0056

Title

Eat up your greens – our changing views on Eutrophication, impacts and assessment guidelines

Organizers

Michelle Devlin and Eileen Bresnan
Center for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science, UK

Abstract

Eutrophication assessments have typically relied on three primary indicators: nutrients, chlorophyll and dissolved oxygen. Secondary indicators, used through various assessment protocols, can also include phytoplankton enumeration, opportunistic macroalgae, and impacts on marine fauna. These traditional indicators have provided a legacy of eutrophication understanding and have been crucial in the communication of impact to marine managers and policymakers. Improved monitoring for multiple international eutrophication assessments is now altering our understanding of regional and temporal variability in coastal responses to anthropogenic nutrient loading. As our coastal and marine areas are further impacted by cumulative impacts of climate and pollution, it is timely to revisit the toolbox of primary and secondary indicators and to explore additional measurements and tools that provide a greater understanding of multi-faceted impacts. This session invites authors to submit papers on such work, including assessments of state via changing nutrient ratios, shifting coastal and marine plankton communities, and further impacts of eutrophication on ecosystem resilience and robustness.

Fragile ecosystems and hotspot management


No:

0033

Title

Science and management of the marine environment around coastal islands and archipelagos

Organizers

Andrew Folkard
Lancaster University, UK

Abstract

Islands and archipelagos located close to continental landmasses are important as hotspots of marine biodiversity. They are also economically valuable for many reasons: for example, as locations for renewable energy installations; as locations for on-shoring infrastructure for offshore energy generation or fuel extraction; as ports for ocean-going shipping; and as ideal sites for seafood harvesting, growth and processing. They are also often sites of particular cultural value, as foci of traditional or experimental coastal or marine management practices. Papers are invited that explore any aspect of this multiplicity of roles and resources, and those that focus on interactions between them are particularly welcome.

 

No:

0043

Title

Mangrove Ecosystem, Bio resources and Sustainable Development

Organizers

Bhawana Pathak
Central University of Gujarat, India

Abstract

Mangroves are among the world’s most productive, enormously diverse, critically endangered at the same time, fragile, sensitive, and tremendously valuable ecosystems. Thus role of mangroves is precious as touchstones and the linchpin for this planet earth to maintain the homeostasis for life. The rapid growth of human population, industrialization, the global economy and several other factors integrated with climate change, sea level rises has led to bringing enormous pressure on the earth’s various resources, environment and these precious ecosystems. The present proposal for the session will highlight mangrove’s ecological importance, their biodiversity and bio resources management, protection and conservation, pollution and its remediation, technological advancements as well as sustainable developmental strategies. The main aim for this session will be understanding the importance of mangroves and cutting-edge research topics on this field from the community of experts to gain solution-focused and action-oriented strategies to collectively achieve the goals of sustainable developments for this planet.

Innovative technology for ecological sustainability


No:

0038

Title

Application of DNA-metabarcoding for ecosystem health assessment

Organizers

Annelies De Backer
ILVO (Flanders Research Institute for Agriculture, Fisheries and Food), Belgium

Abstract

Human use of coastal ecosystems is expanding and diversifying. To conserve and manage ecosystem health, proper management measures need to be taken, which depend on fast and accurate monitoring. DNA-metabarcoding is increasingly investigated as a potential monitoring tool to assess ecosystem health. It could complement or provide a suitable alternative to the traditional assessment methods. This session aims to bring together scientists and managers to discuss advances in DNA metabarcoding for monitoring effects of human activities, for environmental monitoring related to European directives, for identifying ecosystem changes, … We welcome presentations on proof-of-concept examples, fine-tuning of methods, implementation of DNA-metabarcoding in management, genetic indices for ecosystem health assessment,…and this in different types of coastal ecosystems from rocky habitats over soft sediment to coral reefs.

Integrating socio-economics and ecology


No:

0057

Title

Marine and coastal spatial planning in the changing time: science-policy interaction

Organizers

Qinhua Fang
Coastal and Ocean Management Institute, Xiamen University, China

Abstract

Marine spatial planning (MSP) practice has been adopted and evolved in China for almost three decades; the benefits of MSP have also been widely recognised in other Asian countries, therefore many pilot projects have been implemented. Even though in its different developing stages, MSP practice is facing many common challenges including cumulative impacts of multiple sea uses, natural resources and environmental carrying capacity, transboundary issues, effective stakeholder participation, ecosystem-based approach, integrated coastal management, blue economy, enforcement monitoring and evaluation, land-sea interaction and science-policy interaction etc.. This special session, proposed by Coastal and Ocean Management Institute (COMI), Xiamen University of China, will focus on the above challenges and welcomes all scholars and practitioners from both China and other Asian countries who are interested in marine and coastal spatial planning.

Other


No:

0007

Title

Contribution of Universities to Sustainable Development Goal Life Below Water

Organizers

Celene Milanés Batista and Camilo Mateo Botero
Universidad de la Costa, Colombia

Abstract

This session aims at bringing together world leading experts with researchers and scholars from several universities of the world to discuss and disseminate new ideas on Life Below Water goal as well as, to discusses on the role of Higher Education Institutions on promoting and developing new approaches through capacities building and coastal and marine research to meet the Sustainable Development Goals of 2030 agenda.

 

No:

0018

Title

Appropriate solutions to face ocean problems, in support to a better marine management

Organizers

Angel Borja and Michael Elliott
AZTI,

Abstract

Although our seas are facing important challenges (e.g. climate change, biodiversity loss, plastic pollution, etc.), the management measures taken in the last decades, in the framework of European directives (e.g. WFD, MSFD), have changed some decline trends in quality of many systems, contributing to a reduction in eutrophication, reduction of pollution from some metals and organic compounds, recovery of ecosystems (and the associated goods and services), recovery of fishing stocks in some regional seas, increase of Marine Protected Areas, etc. This session aims to bring those positive results from restoration, marine protected areas, maritime spatial planning, fisheries management or reduction of pollutants discharge, to show the positive management measures which can reverse declining trends in marine quality. From that exercise some solutions can emerge and serve as example for areas where still management measures must be taken, contributing to disseminate a positive narrative for society, in which the oceans have still viable solutions to achieve sustainability in their use. All of these solutions can show also the contribution of European research and management to the UN Decade of the Oceans and the UN Decade of Ecological Restoration (both in 2021-2030).

 

No:

0023

Title

Operationalising a systems approach to manage estuaries and coastal areas

Organizers

Ursula M Scharler and Ulrike Schückel2, Victor de Jonge1
1 University of Hull, and International Estuarine & Coastal Specialists Ltd
2University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

Abstract

There are various tools and models available to investigate ecosystem responses to natural and anthropogenically induced variability of that ecosystem’s functioning.
This session concentrates on ecosystem models, and how their metrics can make a meaningful contribution to the development of policies and management of coastal ecosystems. In order for this step to materialise, it is important to understand how fluctuations in ecosystems influence the different metric values, and which types of model results are sufficiently sensitive to track such changes. Furthermore, it is not easy to communicate ecosystem responses to managers and policy makers. Therefore a clear framework of suitable metrics is desirable to move such system’s analysis approaches into the focus of conservation, restoration and sustainable socio-economic use.
We welcome abstracts in the fields of ecosystem models, ecological network analysis, applications, theory, and use in policy and management.

 

No:

0025

Title

Shifts in coastal wetland ecosystem functioning: evidences from historical and palaeoclimatic records

Organizers

Neloy Khare and Rajani Panchang
Ministry of Earth Sciences, India

Abstract

Coastal regions are well known to be sites of high resolution palaeoenvironmental / palaeoclimatic records as well as archaeological records. The proposed session aims at inviting workers from all over the globe and creating a database of diverse case studies that will not only help us trace the evolution of our endangered coastal ecosystems but also provide insights for better management or restoration techniques. It invites researchers to present and discuss the regime shifts in coastal ecosystem functioning through historical and proxy data.

 

No:

0036

Title

Biophysics

Organizers

Eric Wolanski and Jodie Schlaefer
James Cook University, UK

Abstract

This Special Session will focus on coupled biophysical processes during the early phase of marine species of fish larvae and jellyfish, plankton and nekton, which are the very foundation of marine populations and ecosystems. Taking a dual theoretical and empirical approach, it will deal with advances in the fields of movement ecology and oceanography including directional swimming.
Recent advances in our understanding of self-recruitment and connectivity of island, coastal, and estuarine flora and fauna were made possible through integrated observations/biophysical modelling of physical oceanography and biology. Biophysical modelling efforts have been informed by the results of studies on the behaviour of the seeds, eggs, larvae, propagules, juveniles and polyps of riverine, estuarine and coastal species. Studies on the dynamics of populations, microchemical tagging using natural and artificial markers, population genetics and direct observations of trajectories have also enabled and/or improved biophysical modelling applications. These studies suggest that, with increasing physical openness of a given site for a given species, self-recruiting increasingly relies on the behaviour of individuals. Thus an integrated understanding of oceanographic and biological (i.e., early life history traits, including behaviour) processes is increasingly required in dispersal and recruitment studies.
Significant applications of this research are the optimization of MPA networks, the spread of invasive species, diseases, and pollutants in the marine environment, and the impact of climate change on marine ecosystems. This research involves not only individual organisms but also the way groups (swarms, shoals, schools etc) move.

 

No:

0040

Title

From the River Source to the Sea: River-Sea Systems under Global Change

Organizers

Jana Friedrich
Helmholtz Zentrum Geesthacht, Centre for Materials and Coastal Research, Germany

Abstract

This session adresses interdisciplinary science on the continuum from the river source to the sea. We invite presentations of research that cross geographical boundaries; and across the freshwater-marine water transition. We welcome studies that link environmental and social science, address the impacts of climate change and extreme events, and of human activities on water and sediment quality and quantity, hydromorphology, biodiversity, ecosystem functioning and ecosystem services of River-Sea Systems, and that provide recommendations for sustainable management of the River-Sea Systems. Guiding questions are: What constitutes a healthy River-Sea System in the Anthropocene? How are River-Sea Systems changing due to multiple and interacting pressures? How do processes and changes in parts of the River-Sea System propagate within the River-Sea continuum, both up and downstream? How are these changes affecting ecosystem health, its functioning and services? How can we sustainably balance use and protection of River-Sea Systems?

 

Rivers, catchments and wetlands


No:

0047

Title

Stability, change and ecosystem services in coastal wetlands

Organizers

Ben Evans and Bill Austin
University of Cambridge, UK

Abstract

Understanding transitions from coastal wetland stability and resilience to system change (including the potential for sudden collapse) has important implications for the continued delivery of ecosystem services, including the regulating services of carbon sequestration and natural coastal protection, in a changing marine climate. This research agenda requires the monitoring and modelling of wetland change under near-future environmental forcing to be balanced by studies of the biophysical resistive properties of coastal wetlands, at a range of space and time scales.
This session welcomes submissions by those working on the analytical and interpretative challenges of understanding contemporary, and expected near-future, coastal wetland structure, stability, and change, including researchers in the field of blue carbon dynamics. We particularly welcome papers on the application of emerging environmental monitoring technologies, innovative field and laboratory experimentation, and citizen science methods to these problems. We are committed to supporting presentations by early career researchers. This session will also be of interest to practitioners working in climate mitigation and to those concerned with enhancing, restoring, and valuing ecosystem services in coastal wetland contexts.

Sustainability and resilience


No:

0041

Title

Mega-deltas vs bay areas: Anthropodynamics

Organizers

Shu Gao and Ian Townend
East China Normal University, China

Abstract

Estuaries and coasts in the Anthropocene period face large challenges of providing solutions to future sustainability; this is particularly the case for large river deltas and coastal embayments. Thus, it would be appropriate to consider the task from a viewpoint of “anthropodynamics”, i.e., a dynamic system with human-induced activities being a dominating process. In terms of the scientific question, the relative importance of natural conditions for delta and bay area economic-social development needs analysis. Statistically, it appears that the mega-deltas of the world do not necessarily have a status of an economic center; in contrast, the presence of a bay area with a suitable size is perhaps more important. Thus, the comparison and/or interrelationship between the delta and the embayment is worth analyzing. The natural conditions, together with their stability, their changes in response to human development and the controlling mechanisms, should be investigated. In this session, these topics will be discussed, eventually leading to a synthesis of the key factors, mechanisms, quantitative relationships and governing equations of the anthropodynamics, for mega-delta, coastal embayment and delta-bay systems.

Register Now
Supporting Publications
Organised by
 
  • Elsevier
  • ECSA
  • EMECS